Friday, September 24, 2021

CFP: 9th International Open Science Conference (March 08-09, 2022) Online Conference #osc2022

The 9th International Open Science Conference will be held on March 08-09, 2022. Please save the date. Stay tuned for more information here:

https://www.open-science-conference.eu/

For this conference, we invite you to submit an abstract for one of the following calls:
Call for Speakers , Call for Poster Presentations

The abstract submission deadline is October 15, 2021.

The Open Science Conference 2022 is the 9th international conference of the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science. The annual conference is dedicated to the Open Science movement. It provides a unique forum for researchers, librarians, practitioners, infrastructure providers, policy makers, and other important stakeholders to discuss the latest and future developments in Open Science. The conference offers insights into both practical and technical innovations that serve the implementation of open practices as well as current and pioneering developments in the global Open Science movement. Such developments are, for example, the increasing plea for open practices as lessons learned from global crises as well as recent discussions about the relation of Open Science and knowledge equity. The conference offers many opportunities for networking and exchange.

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Call for Nominations: Popular Culture Association - Allen Ellis Digital Research Award in Popular Culture

Call for Nominations: 

Popular Culture Association 

Allen Ellis Digital Research Award in Popular Culture 

This award recognizes the outstanding contribution of an academic database to the study of Popular Culture and American Culture developed within the past three years.  Criteria will include use of hypertext/networking, use of supplementary/secondary materials, breadth of archived material,  and ease of searching and updatability. 

 

Committee Chair: Casey Hoeve 

achoeve@unl.edu 

Electronic research sites produced within the last three years are eligible for this year’s award. The deadline for these materials is December 2, 2021. 

How to submit a nomination 

Anyone may nominate a potential resource. 

  1. Identify the individual award for which you’d like to be considered (Allen Ellis Digital Research Award in Popular Culture) 
  2. Fill out the Award Entry form and email it to both the Chairperson(s) of that specific award committee (Casey Hoeve; achoeve@unl.edu) and the VP of Awards, Brenda Boudreau, at bboudreau@mckendree.edu​. 
  3. Winners will be notified in February.  Awards will be presented at the annual Popular Culture Association Conference in April. 

CFP: Serials Review Special Issue on Metrics for Scholarly Communication

Call for Proposals for Serials Review Special Issue on Metrics for Scholarly Communication. Please consider submitting a proposal! Meg Mering


The IFLA Serials and Other Continuing Resources Section is sponsoring a special issue of Serials Review devoted to Metrics for Scholarly Communication. Both research papers and papers on best practices are welcome, as well as opinion papers and research-in-progress.

 

Ongoing developments in scholarly communication have brought a need to adapt how we measure it – whether that means using traditional metrics (e.g., bibliometrics) in new ways or pursuing other types of metrics (e.g., infometrics, altmetrics). Papers dealing with any aspect of metrics for scholarly communication are welcome. Some suggested topics include but are not limited to:


  • Repository metrics
  • Relationship of open access to citation rates of published works
  • Libraries’ promotion of researchers’ unique identifiers and the impact on publications’ visibility and citation rates.
  • Scientometric evaluation of citation rates
  • Metrics related to selection and evaluation of database and subscription packages
  • Bibliometric monitoring of periodicals published by universities to evaluate the prospects for indexing (e.g., Web of Science, Scopus)
  • Library practice of metrics for selection and evaluation of the most influential serials for research publications

 

The fundamental goal of the papers in this special issue is that they be applicable to library activities and consider metrics related to scholarly communication.

Written proposals should include the following information and are due September 20, 2021:

  • Name(s) and affiliation(s) of author(s
  • Proposed title of the article
  • Proposed abstract of the article (no more than 500 words)
  • Brief biographical information of all author(s)
  • Contact information, including email, of all author(s) 

The project committee will respond to proposals by October 20, 2021 and completed articles will be due January 14, 2022.

Please send your proposal to Meg Mering at mmering1@unl.edu by October 4, 2021

Meg Mering

Professor
Metadata Quality Librarian
Scholarly Communications Unit
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries

Friday, September 17, 2021

CFP: That was Then, This is Now: Libraries Adapting for the Future - Southeastern Michigan League of Libraries Fall Meeting (Nov 19th, 2021)

 The Southeastern Michigan League of Libraries, SEMLOL, is preparing a virtual program for the Fall membership meeting titled “That was Then, This is Now: Libraries Adapting for the Future.” 

 

Did your library implement any new programs, procedures, or policies in the last year and a half which have been successful or show promise? What efforts have worked well for your library that you plan to continue? What worked well in the moment and helped your library adapt quickly, but has served its purpose?

 

We welcome presentations, lightning talks, and virtual poster proposals. We are also looking for volunteers to participate in a live panel discussion. 

 

Topics include but are not limited to: 

  • liaison work, 

  • new access policies, 

  • outreach efforts to classes, faculty, or individual students, 

  • events/programming/workshops 

  • promoting community and social-emotional wellness for your campus, 

  • maintaining connections with and between students, 

  • collection development initiatives, 

  • meeting changed information needs,

  • interactive activities, or

  • cross-curricular learning. 

 

Proposals may be for anything from 10 minute lightning talks to 40 minutes long full-presentations. Live or pre-recorded content is acceptable, however presenters are expected to attend the meeting for Q&A. Panelists are also expected to attend the meeting as the panel discussion will be live and interactive. 

 

The Fall SEMLOL meeting will take place Friday, Nov. 19, 2021 beginning at 2:00 PM on Zoom.

 

Proposal Submission Deadline Is October 1st, 2021. 

 

To submit a proposal, please send the title, name of speaker(s), and an abstract of no more than 250 words to semlol.board@gmail.com by Friday, Oct. 1, 2021. Accepted proposals will be notified by Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. We would also like to have our panel in place by then, so please send your name and brief description (100 words or less) of your successes during this time by Oct. 1st if you are interested in joining the panel discussion.

 

Public and Special Librarians and LIS students are encouraged to submit proposals based on their experiences, jobs, or internships. 

 

We look forward to your submissions! 

 

SEMLOL Executive Board 

Amy Seipke - Chair, Executive Board




P.S. SEMLOL is looking for a few academic librarians in SE Michigan to serve as members of the Executive Board. If you or anyone you know are looking for an opportunity to get involved in the field or take on a leadership role, please consider joining us. The time commitment is small but the help you can provide is big! Contact Amy Seipke at this email address with a  short, informal synopsis of your experience in the field, if you are interested.

Thursday, September 16, 2021

CFP: Toward Equitable Knowledge Gathering and Sharing: Stony Brook University Libraries 6th Annual Open Access Symposium (October 28-29, 2021) - New Deadline

  Call for Posters and Panelists


Toward Equitable Knowledge Gathering and Sharing

 

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 6th ANNUAL OPEN ACCESS SYMPOSIUM


October 28-29, 2021

Times TBA


LOCATION: Virtual

OPEN DATE: August 27, 2021

DEADLINE: September 24, 2021 -- New Deadline


Toward Equitable Knowledge Gathering and Sharing.  Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium is inviting applications for panelists and or presented posters.  This year’s symposium will be held virtually and there is no fee to attend.


In keeping with this year’s theme, we’re interested in panelists and posters that reflect the role of equitable and inclusive open knowledge in open access environments, systems, and practices. We welcome applications on a variety of open access topics, including but not limited to:


  • Scholarship: rethinking and demonstrating different modes of presenting it


  • Open Educational Resources: use and implementation


  • Data management: recognizing and meeting constituents’ needs


APPLY: We will receive and review proposals until September 17, 2021.  Please limit proposals to 100 words or less.  Send to: mona.ramonetti@stonybrook.edu


Additional queries: Contact Mona Ramonetti, Head of Scholarly Communication.  mona.ramonetti@stonybrook.edu


Mona Ramonetti, MSLIS, MSMNS
Head of Scholarly Communication
Stony Brook University OER Campus Lead

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

CFP: (Book Chapters): What Can Government Information Do for Me? Discovery and Practical Applications of Using U.S. Government Information

We are seeking chapter proposals for a new edited collection tentatively titled "What Can Government Information Do for Me? Discovery and Practical Applications of Using U.S. Government Information", to be published by McFarland & Company.

The purpose of this work is to explore the identification of and practical application of U.S. government information.  Libraries will be provided with information about finding and applying readily available and free U.S. government information sources.  Library personnel must remain knowledgeable about critical agencies and departments of the U.S. Government and their websites, how to navigate the websites, learn what basic information each provides, and what "hidden treasures" are available.  Library personnel  need to understand how to apply this information in the performance of their duties and learn from the experiences of colleagues.  This includes answering various types of patron questions, performing community outreach, engaging in civic activities, serving business patrons, and providing classroom instruction.

This work will collect chapters that focus on various topics and how users can navigate various U.S. departments and agencies, and their websites, to find information and answer practical problems.  For example, one chapter could focus on finding information about grants and federal government internships.  This could be of value to high school, college, and graduate students who are looking to build their resumes, but might not have thought about the federal government as a source for grants and internships. Most government agencies offer internships of some kind, from humanities, to medical, to science, to agriculture - a plethora of resources that could be useful to any major or interest a student might have.

Please submit a proposal of 250-500 words for consideration.

The audience is librarians and library professions from academic, public, school, federal, and special libraries.  The book's thesis is to provide a volume that informs the reader about U.S. Government resources, how to use these resources to answer different topics, and provide practical applications the reader can implement and adapt in one's library environment. This will be a very practical, "hands-on" work to guide people to resources they might not have ever discovered.

Topics could include, but not limited to:

  •  Serial Set
  •  Entrepreneurship/starting a business/business plans/nonprofits/funding
  •  Treaties
  •  Executive Orders and Proclamations
  •  Military
  •  Presidential Campaigns/history
  •  Finding Images
  •  Native American History
  •  Census Bureau Statistics - case studies (e.g. business, population studies)
  •  Current Events
  •  Health and Human Services - health, nutrition, smoking, fitness, epidemics
  •  Lobbying/Campaign Financing/Expenditures
  •  International Trade
  •  Science (e.g. NASA, NOAA, NWS, USGS)
  •  Genealogical searching
  •  Researching an Industry with relevant examples
  •  Finding money - could include grants, property searches, and unclaimed money from the government, benefits and loans, spending, saving, and investing
  •  Federal job openings and internships

An example of a chapter on employment could include tracking these government sources:

By October 15, 2021, please email your chapter proposals to the co-editors:

Tom Diamond
Louisiana State University
notted@lsu.edu<mailto:notted@lsu.edu>

Dominique Hallett
Arkansas State University
dhallett@astate.edu<mailto:dhallett@astate.edu>

CFP: It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity - 5th Biennial Open Access Conference at San José State University (Oct 29, 2021)

5th Biennial Open Access Conference at San José State University. Please consider submitting a proposal or attending this free, virtual conference.


It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity


Biennial Open Access Conference at San José State University

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Library

October 29, 2021, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM PDT

This will be a virtual conference and registration will be free


Call for Proposals


Efforts to open access to knowledge, research, and scholarship are often focused on building new structures: new systems for distributing and archiving scholarship and data, new reward structures for researchers, new cultures of research that favor openness. But simply opening access does not ensure a more equitable knowledge environment. Without intervention, new and open structures can reproduce existing structural inequalities.


The recently released UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, which inspired the theme for this year’s International Open Access Week and for this conference, proposes a framework for equitable, open structures for science on the national and international level. Libraries and library workers often work at a much more local level, but in many ways we are implicated in the same structural concerns. These concerns manifest in the systems we build and in the systems, structures, institutions, and corporations that form the context for our work.


Because “it matters how” we do our work, this conference will focus on ways that the structures of “open” promote or inhibit a diverse, inclusive, and equitable scholarly communication environment.


In our upcoming conference, we invite proposals for presentations of 10, 30, or 60 minutes. Topics include but are not limited to: 


  • Open access and institutional repositories

  • Institutional policies, mandates, workflows, and cultures related to open access

  • Open access and information literacy

  • Open access and faculty labor, including tenure processes and contingent employment

  • Disciplinary cultures, structures, and practices surrounding open access

  • Transformative agreements

  • Infrastructure for open access: open source software, proprietary platforms, and institutional realities

  • OERs, Open Science, Open Data, Open Humanities, Open Knowledge

  • Promoting open access to faculty, administrators, and legislators

  • Vendor consolidation and open access

  • Scholarly communication futures and the impact of open access

  • Curation and preservation of open access journals, pre-prints, books, and data

 

Conference website: https://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/oa-un-conference/

Submit a proposal: https://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/cgi/ir_submit.cgi?context=oa-un-conference


Monday, September 13, 2021

CFP: Library 2.021: Libraries as Community Anchors Online Conference – October 21, 2021

 Library 2.021: Libraries as Community Anchors Online Conference – October 21, 2021

  

Submit a Proposal: https://www.library20.com/callforproposals

Have you addressed challenges associated with digital equity, access, and inclusion, as well as issues of security and privacy? Have you successfully worked to provide baseline, public, computer and internet access? Do you see your library as a "Community Anchor Institution?" If so, please consider submitting a proposal for this year’s Library 2.0 conference: "Libraries as Community Anchors," which will take place on October 21, 2021. Everyone is welcome to submit a presentation proposal.   Proposals will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis starting August 6th, 2021, and closing on September 24th.

 

 

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/library-2021-libraries-as-community-anchors-registration-165258497615

 

The third Library 2.021 mini-conference: "Libraries as Community Anchors," will be held online (and for free) on Thursday, October 21st, 2021.


Libraries are increasingly addressing challenges associated with digital equity, access, and inclusion, as well as issues of security and privacy. For many years, community members have looked to public libraries to provide baseline, public, computer and internet access. In this way, libraries exist as important Community Anchor Institutions (CAIs), defined by the FCC “as schools, libraries, hospitals and other medical providers, public safety entities, institutions of higher education, and community support organizations that facilitate greater use of broadband by vulnerable populations, including low-income, the unemployed, and the aged” (FCC, 2011, p. 38).  In light of the recent Covid-19 pandemic and other natural disasters such as floods, drought, firestorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes, universal access to the internet has never been more important. Libraries increasingly have an important role to play: as second responders in large scale events via the development and deployment of collaborative connectivity projects; in developing strategies to bridge technological digital divides; and to promote digital access, equity, opportunity, and inclusion.

 

Everyone is invited to participate in our Library 2.0 conference events, which are designed to foster collaboration and knowledge sharing among information professionals worldwide. Each three-hour event consists of a keynote panel, 10-15 crowd-sourced thirty-minute presentations, and a closing keynote.

 

For more details see the message below or visit https://mailchi.mp/bc6de5a0f850/registration-open-whats-a-library-part-32-2021-outlook-with-pla-president-and-ga-state-librarian-10427840?e=2cb2b11ed8

 

This event is being organized in partnership with Don Means, Director of the GIGABIT LIBRARIES NETWORK, and Kristen Radsliff Rebmann,  Professor in the School of Information at San José State University.

Friday, September 10, 2021

CFP: Toward Equitable Knowledge Gathering and Sharing: Stony Brook University Libraries 6th Annual Open Access Symposium (October 28-29, 2021)

 Call for Posters and Panelists


Toward Equitable Knowledge Gathering and Sharing

 

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 6th ANNUAL OPEN ACCESS SYMPOSIUM


October 28-29, 2021

Times TBA


LOCATION: Virtual

OPEN DATE: August 27, 2021

DEADLINE: September 17, 2021


Toward Equitable Knowledge Gathering and Sharing.  Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium is inviting applications for panelists and or presented posters.  This year’s symposium will be held virtually and there is no fee to attend.


In keeping with this year’s theme, we’re interested in panelists and posters that reflect the role of equitable and inclusive open knowledge in open access environments, systems, and practices. We welcome applications on a variety of open access topics, including but not limited to:


  • Scholarship: rethinking and demonstrating different modes of presenting it


  • Open Educational Resources: use and implementation


  • Data management: recognizing and meeting constituents’ needs


APPLY: We will receive and review proposals until September 17, 2021.  Please limit proposals to 100 words or less.  Send to: mona.ramonetti@stonybrook.edu


Additional queries: Contact Mona Ramonetti, Head of Scholarly Communication.  mona.ramonetti@stonybrook.edu


Mona Ramonetti, MSLIS, MSMNS
Head of Scholarly Communication
Stony Brook University OER Campus Lead