Wednesday, June 02, 2010

Call for book chapters: Crisis Information Management: Communication and Technologies

Call for book chapters: Crisis Information Management: Communication and Technologies

Editor: Chris Hagar, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Dominican University, River Forest, IL, USA

Publisher: Chandos Publishing, Oxford, UK (part of Woodhead Publishing Ltd.)

Proposal Submission Deadline: June 30, 2010

Accepted Full Chapters Due: December 31, 2010


Crisis situations have been studied from a risk communication perspective, from a management perspective, systems perspective, and more recently from an information perspective. Crises usually present complex information environments, and as events such as Hurricane Katrina, 9/11, the Haiti earthquake have demonstrated that there is a great need to understand how individuals, government, and non-government agencies organize, manage, access, and disseminate information during crisis situations. Information management problems and information technology failures have been cited as significant factors in the failed responses to many crises. This book will explore the management and communication of information in crises, particularly the interconnectedness of information, people, and technologies during crises. It will bring together chapters written by researchers, academics, and practitioners from a variety of information perspectives in crisis response and management.

Book chapters are sought, but are not limited to the following:

The role of ICTs during crisis response, the role of social media tools in crisis response, citizen communication in crises, information system models, role of community and community networks during crises, integration and co-ordination of information in crises, information needs and information seeking behaviours during crises, the role of sense-making in crises, trust and information in crises, government response to crises, disaster response and the role of libraries and archives in crises, and information lessons learned from crises.


This book will be of interest to a variety of practitioners, researchers and academics in information science, information management, knowledge management, libraries, and information systems, but also to other fields e.g. government, state, local emergency management and planning; non government organizations; risk management; communications; community planners, and public health.


Potential contributors are invited to submit on or before June 30 2010, a 1-2 page proposal including background, structure, and an indication of outcomes. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by July 14th, 2010 and sent chapter organizational guidelines. Please send submissions to Dr Chris Hagar