Friday, July 20, 2018

CFP: Working Title: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace


Call for papers and essays
Working Title: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace
Editors: Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov, Amanda H. McLellan
Deadline for drafts: September 5, 2018
Publisher: American Library Association Press (ALA Press)
Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1
We are soliciting a diverse range of essays and narratives from practicing U.S. academic, public and special libraries staff, for inclusion in a curated anthology that empowers library employees to change real-world issues pertaining to library staff. Submissions may include any phase of project development, but we are especially seeking: perspectives and advice on how to make and implement change, how to talk to administration about needs, the specific steps taken in the process, solutions to roadblocks and recognition of the future needs of staff. We also seek narratives, steps and ideas from administrators on how to implement and create a positive work environment and the challenges faced in this process. Paraprofessional staff and first-time authors are encouraged to apply.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Lactation accommodation
  • Flexible scheduling
  • Development of policies and procedures allowing remote work (i.e. weather related absences for employees with leave time deficits)
  • Childcare accommodations
  • Changing tables in restrooms
  • Parental leave policies
  • Space and time for dialysis or other medical needs
  • Standing desks
  • Promotion of exercise at work
  • Inclusive ideas for work outings, gatherings or meetings
  • Veterans on active duty or return from duty
  • Race and ethnicity inclusion and sensitivity
  • Gender neutral bathrooms
  • Dealing with bias
  • Providing space for prayer and/or meditation
  • Inclusive recruitment practices
  • Updating policies to be more inclusive
  • Development of policies and space for employees with varying sensory needs (Autism spectrum, PTSD, etc)
  • Case studies of libraries that have successfully handled difficult situations regarding discrimination or harassment.
  • Employees returning to school for further education
Timeline

Deadline for Draft Submission: September 5, 2018
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: October 10, 2018
Final submission for accepted drafts: Jan. 12, 2019

Submissions:

*This anthology will contain commentary, narratives and experiences.  Drafts accepted must be between four to six pages double spaced (about 350 words per page).  A suggested template will be provided for all accepted submissions to the anthology.

*Materials cannot be previously published or simultaneously submitted.

*All photos, illustrations, graphs etc. must have a Creative Commons License or be in the public domain. The submission’s author is responsible for verifying that these materials fall under the respected licenses. Each will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and will be at the discretion of the editors for inclusion.
*If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.
*Accepted contributors should expect to sign a release form in order to be published, and will agree to follow submission guidelines.

*Compensation includes one complimentary copy of published anthology for each contributing author

We STRONGLY encourage submission from all regardless of classification of positions within academic and public libraries. We are seeking input from administrators, faculty, as well as staff employees.

CFP: ACRL DVC (Delaware Valley) Fall 2018 Program - October 26, 2019 (Philadelphia, PA)

ACRL DVC Fall 2018 Program
When: October 26, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM
Where: Drexel University’s Learning Terrace
Theme: Librarians as Advocates: Leading Activism on Your Campus and Beyond
CFP URL: http://www.acrldvc.org/news/2018/07/19/acrl-dvc-fall-2018-program-call-for-presenters/

This program seeks to provide insight into the activism and advocacy work being done in libraries in higher education across the Delaware Valley region. In times of inequity, discrimination, and social injustice, libraries have the opportunity to be institutions of resistance, understanding, and hope. We are bringing together librarians who would like to share how they have incorporated democracy, equity, intellectual freedom, and privacy into their projects and collaborations to advocate for their communities. Successful proposals will demonstrate an analysis of the underlying power structures that motivate their efforts. Whether your advocacy work takes the form of outreach projects, pedagogical techniques, systems or application development, cataloging practice, or collaborative projects, we would like to give you the opportunity to share your work and its impact with colleagues.

Topics should be related to library leadership in social change including:
  • Services for students with marginalized identities, including documentation status
  • Poverty, food insecurity, or homelessness
  • Voter registration and electoral issues
  • Social, mental, and health-related services
  • Access and textbook-related services
  • Library-related legislation
  • Privacy
  • Diversity, inclusion, and equity
  • Workplace fairness and rights issues

The deadline to submit is September 10 with notification by September 15, 2018.
Submission Information
  • Proposals must include the following information:
  • Proposal title
  • Names, affiliations, positions, and email addresses of the presenters
  • Preferred presentation format
  • Option A – 10-minute lightning round presentation only
  • Option B – 10-minute lightning round presentation and roundtable facilitation.
  • A 250-word summary of the topic you wish to present including the points you intend to make and the way(s) you intend to engage the audience, if applicable

To propose a session please visit: https://goo.gl/forms/ZOls6D1Xker3b1o83


Questions? E-mail Jess Denke at jessicadenke@muhlenberg.edu


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

CFP: Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Popular Culture area at Popular Culture Association Annual Conference (April 2019 - Washington DC)

The Popular Culture Association annual conference will be held April 17-20, 2019, at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, DC. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines will meet to share their Popular Culture research and interests.

The Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Popular Culture area is soliciting papers dealing with any aspect of Popular Culture as it pertains to libraries, archives, museums, or research. Possible topics include:

  • Descriptions of research collections or exhibits
  • Studies of popular images of libraries, librarians, archives, or museums
  • Analyses of social networking or web resources
  • Popular Culture in library education/information literacy
  • The future of libraries and librarians
  • Developments in technical services for collecting/ preserving Popular Culture materials

Papers from graduate students are welcome

The deadline for submitting a proposal is October 1, 2018

Proposals may be submitted on the conference website.

Please direct any questions to the area chair or co-chair for Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Popular Culture:

Allen Ellis
Professor of Library Services
W. Frank Steely Library
Northern Kentucky University
Highland Heights, KY  41099-6101
859-572-5527

Co-chair: Casey Hoeve
Associate Professor
509A Hale Library
Kansas State University
Manhattan, KS  66506
785-532-7672


Tuesday, July 17, 2018

CFP: LITA Programs at ALA Annual (Washington DC, June 20-25, 2019)

Submit your program ideas for the 2019 ALA Annual Conference

Washington DC, June 20-25, 2019

LITA is now encouraging the submission of innovative and creative proposals for the 2019 Annual American Library Association Conference. We’re looking for 60 minute conference presentations. The focus should be on technology in libraries, whether that’s use of, new ideas for, trends in, or interesting/innovative projects being explored – it’s all for you to propose. Programs should be of interest to all library/information agency types, that inspire technological change and adoption, and generally go above and beyond the everyday.

  • Submission Deadline: August 31, 2018
  • Final Decisions: November 9, 2018
  • Schedule of Sessions Announced: December 5, 2018

Proposals will be accepted via one submission site for all ALA Divisions, RoundTables, Committees and Offices. This link to the submission site will redirect to the ALA log-in page. All submitters are required to have an ALA profile, but are not required to be ALA members.

Information on pre-conference submissions is forthcoming.

Help and details on making a successful submission are on the LITA Forms web site.

We regularly receive many more proposals than we can program into the slots available to LITA at the ALA Annual Conference. These great ideas and programs all come from contributions like yours. Submissions are open to anyone, regardless of ALA membership status. We welcome proposals from anyone who feels they have something to offer regarding library technology. We look forward to hearing the great ideas you will share with us this year.

Questions or Comments?

Contact LITA at (312) 280-4268 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org

CFP: Open Access Sessions at National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) - October 2018 Alexandria, Virginia

NFAIS Call For Presenters!



Interested in presenting at this event? Our call for presentations is open until July 31, 2018 

Open Access (OA) continues to offer transformative change in traditional scholarly research that is moving us toward an open science future. From research development to scholarly output, creating a more transparent end-to-end process allows unfettered sharing, inclusion and collaboration as a continuum in scientific research and discovery. As we support researchers through OA initiatives, we are creating science without barriers.

NFAIS will explore this multidimensional disruption at our "Movements and Models Supporting Open Access" conference on October 1 - 2, 2018 in Old Town Alexandria, VA, and we invite you join the discussion as a speaker!

The program will address emerging OA practices, statistics and analytics of open access models, and new publishing models that deliver fully affordable open access. If you are a university library supporting unique OA models, an advocate of open access, or can share how your organization is making progress on the OA movement, we invite you to become a speaker and share trends, new technologies, and applications to others in the industry. You may be selected to present alone, with a co-presenter, or as a panel.

NFAIS is looking for visionary, inspiring and future-focused presenters who can elevate discussions on open access, debate and provide practical ideas and solutions, as we explore thought-provoking topics such as open publishing and open peer reviews; policy, best practices and compliance; alternative models; and the role of the researcher in open access.

Benefits of Presenting with NFAIS

    • Gain visibility as a thought leader in the global information services community
    • Create a launch pad for debate and discussion
    • Influence and shape the future of information services
    • Reach a high-caliber audience of key leaders and decision makers
    • Help others succeed and ensure they avoid common pitfalls
    • Boost the profile of yourself and your organization
    • Network with colleagues and make new connections

For more information about the NFAIS OA Conference, contact Nancy Blair-DeLeon, NFAIS Director of Professional Development, nblairdeleon@nfais.org, 443-221-2980 (ext. 102).

Call for Chapters for ACRL's The Sustainable Library's Cookbook (2019)

Call for Chapters for ACRL's The Sustainable Library's Cookbook (2019) edited by Raymond Pun and Dr. Gary L. Shaffer

Deadline extended - July 25, 2018

Send your proposals/questions to raypun101@gmail.com with submissions and questions. Note if you submitted a proposal already to acrlsustainable@gmail.com, please re-send it to raypun101@gmail.com, apologies for that and thank you! (acrlsustainable@gmail.com will be defunct)

We are seeking "recipes" or chapter proposals on practice-based examples of lesson plans or projects that support sustainability efforts in academic libraries. Recipes will follow the ACRL CookbookFormat. Your 500-to-700 word proposal submission should describe a successful lesson plan or activity that support sustainability in the academic library. They can be related to these three key areas:

Section 1. Applying Sustainable Thinking and Development - Applying sustainable thinking into library functions including information technology, finance, facilities, waste management, human resources, space planning, etc.:

  • Triple Bottom Line (financial/economic, environmental, as well as social (internal/workforce and external/social justice and campus community) concepts applied in different areas of library services
  • Installing solar panels in the library, upgrading lighting systems in library facilities, supporting alternatives to driving; green technology, architecture planning; extension; developing strategies to minimize cost, utilize costs;
  • Integrating the UN Sustainable Development Goals 2030 in your library practices
  • Addressing issues of poverty, inequity and food shortage in your campus; dumpster diving projects;
  • Strategic planning for sustainable practices in specific areas of the library; special grant projects or case studies; disaster-planning projects; makerspaces; OER and textbooks; sustainable printing;
  • Assessment/evaluation plans for sustainability practices; marketing sustainability developments in the library

Section 2. Teaching, Learning and Research Services - Supporting sustainability studies in the areas of teaching, learning and research services including information literacy, one-shots, technology, integrating ACRL New Frameworks,  threshold concepts, discipline tracks - first year writing, communications, STEM instructions, community of teaching practices, and subject/liaison responsibilities:

  • Teaching FYE STEM using campus sustainability as the research topic
  • Building a data research/scientific data program to support sustainability studies, water studies or renewable energy; ecological and environmental education; green literacy
  • Teaching a information literacy workshop to environmental studies, food studies, agriculture, transportation studies/engineering, sociology, anthropology, political science or urban studies, architecture, business/entrepreneurship/marketing classes that address sustainable development, climate change, green energy, alternative fuels, sustainable housing, clean transportation, etc.
  • Integrating GIS skills and tools in library instruction to support sustainability studies; digital scholarship or humanities/area studies projects covering sustainability/environmental studies
  • Integrating environmental, economic, and social justices in your teaching practices; Liaison to Water/Environmental Institutes/Centers

Section 3. Community Engagement, Outreach, and Partnerships - Forming new partnerships, outreach services or community engagement programs to inform sustainability practices in the library and beyond:

  • Forming partnerships with communities to promote environmental awareness issues
  • Partnering with Career Development Center to host a job/internship fair on green energy and jobs;
  • Collaborating with Sustainability Student Club to coordinate new programs or events in the library such as urban farms, organic food productions, collaborative collection development, green collections; World Water Day, World Earth Day, environmental awareness;
  • Partnerships with public libraries, government agencies, environmental and other community groups for reading clubs, activities, engagements
  • Building local/indigenous knowledge and collaborating with community experts relating to sustainability, ecology, etc.

Deadline for Contributors' proposals: July 25, 2018 (flexible)
Editors Review + Notification for Contributors: July 30, 2018
Final Recipes Due: October 1, 2018

Please refer to the The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009) and The First Year Experience Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. You can send as many proposals as you like. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics. Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals! Once the proposal has been accepted, we will happy to send a template over.

Any questions? Need to submit? Send email to raypun101@gmail.com
Co-editors:
Raymond Pun, California State University, Fresno and Dr. Gary L. Shaffer, USC Marshall School of Business

Monday, July 16, 2018

CFP: Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

The Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ) exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.

We are now accepting proposals for publication in our 42nd issue.  Don’t miss out on this opportunity to share your ideas and experiences. To be included in the 42nd issue, which is scheduled for publication in early November, 2018, please submit proposals to http://journal.code4lib.org/submit-proposal by Friday,  August 3, 2018.  The editorial committee will review all proposals and notify those accepted by Friday, August 10, 2018.  Please note that submissions are subject to rejection or postponement at any point in the publication process as determined by the Code4Lib Journal’s editorial committee.

C4LJ encourages creativity and flexibility, and the editors welcome submissions across a broad variety of topics that support the mission of the journal. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Practical applications of library technology (both actual and hypothetical)
  • Technology projects (failed, successful, or proposed), including how they were done and challenges faced
  • Case studies
  • Best practices
  • Reviews
  • Comparisons of third party software or libraries
  • Analyses of library metadata for use with technology
  • Project management and communication within the library environment
  • Assessment and user studies


C4LJ strives to promote professional communication by minimizing the barriers to publication. While articles should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure. Writers should aim for the middle ground between blog posts and articles in traditional refereed journals. Where appropriate, we encourage authors to submit code samples, algorithms, and pseudo-code. For more information, visit C4LJ’s Article Guidelines or browse articles from the earlier issues published on our website: http://journal.code4lib.org.
Send in a submission. Your peers would like to hear what you are doing.

Andrew Darby, Coordinating Editor for Issue 42
Code4Lib Journal Editorial Committee

CFP: The Collective 2019 (Knoxville, TN, March 6th-8th, 2019)

The Collective 2019
Knoxville, Tennessee
March 6th-8th, 2019

Can a library conference be equal parts affordable, fun, and useful? Past attendees of The Collective think so!

If you’re looking for fantastic, hands-on professional development without the intimidating size or inflated price tag, we’re the event for you.

Wanna find out more virtually? Check out our our 2019 Conference Theme and CFP (www.thelibrarycollective.org/program) , which is open for ideas, voting, and comments now until August 3!

To Submit: Include these 5 things:
  1. Short Session Description. (~ 100 words)
  2. Session Format & Style. Is it a hands-on workshop, series of lightning talks, discussion roundtable, pecha kucha, small group breakout, interactive panel, make/hack/play session, a tool or demo that you'd like to showcase in our TinkerLab, or some other innovative format? No "sage on stage" allowed!  Hint: Check out the Past Programs to see some formats that worked well and to see what fit last year's theme!
  3.  Takeaways. Describe tangible takeaways, skills, or interactive elements that participants will glean from your session (e.g., are there handouts? are you making something during the session? what will they learn? etc.)
  4.  Organization. Let us know here if you have a formed group of organizers or if you plan to post a Call for Participation (CFP) if selected. We encourage sessions that are not yet fully-formed--there will be opportunities to post CFPs on our website after Round One selections are made and we can also help you make connections!
  5.  Contact Information. Include the name of the primary organizer(s) with contact information. Don’t forget to add your email! We need this to get in touch with you again if your idea is selected for Round Two.
Then use the green Submit widget button on the right or visit the 2019 forum directly to submit your idea!


Call for Reviewers: ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Needs You!

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors are seeking volunteers to author reviews for the October 2018 issue. To volunteer, choose a resource from the list below and complete our Reviewer Interest form (https://goo.gl/forms/mpOOJZaCBb6wIXpA2) by Tuesday, July 31.

Initial draft submissions are due Monday, September 3.

Contributing to ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews is a great opportunity to get involved with the Society, learn about interesting new resources, and help shape the publication. Please feel free to read the complete review guidelines and direct comments and questions about the reviews to arlisna.mtr@gmail.com.

Submitted by ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors:
Melanie Emerson
Gabriella Karl-Johnson
Alexandra Provo

Resources for Review: We seek reviewers for the following resources.
**The snippets below are taken from each resource's web page and are not necessarily the opinions of the M&T Reviews Co-Editors

Hugh Edwards
Hugh Edwards was one of the most influential, yet least known, photography curators in America. During his time at the Art Institute, he worked with remarkable enthusiasm and prescience to build the museum’s photography collection and expand its exhibition program, acquiring some three thousand works and organizing seventy-five shows. In a field that was still young, Edwards helped to shape institutional practices and the public’s understanding of photography in Chicago as well as across the country.

Picturing Places
A new free online resource which explores the Library’s extensive holdings of landscape imagery. The British Library’s huge collection of historic prints and drawings is a treasure trove waiting to be discovered. Picturing Places showcases works of art by well-known artists such as Thomas Gainsborough and J.M.W. Turner alongside images by a multitude of lesser-known figures. Only a few have ever been seen or published before.

Connect Vermeer
For many art lovers and museum visitors, Johannes Vermeer stands out as the mysterious genius of Dutch seventeenth-century genre painting. However, as this website reveals, he was not working in isolation. ...Through a series of interactive visualisations, this website allows users to discover the network of connections between Vermeer and his sixteen contemporaries. Users can discover the strength and likelihood of relationships between the seventeen artists, the impact of an individual artist’s paintings on the work of his contemporaries, as well as how artists adopted, adapted and disguised elements, from their peers’ work, in their own paintings.

Parker Library on the Web
The Parker Library's holdings of Old English texts account for a substantial proportion of all extant manuscripts in Anglo-Saxon, including the earliest copy of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (c. 890), unique copies of Old English poems and other texts, and King Alfred's translation of Gregory the Great's Pastoral Care. The Parker Library also contains key Anglo-Norman and Middle English texts ranging from the Ancrene Wisse and the Brut Chronicle to one of the finest copies of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde. Other subjects represented in the collection are theology, music, medieval travelogues and maps, apocalypses, bestiaries, royal ceremonies, historical chronicles and Bibles. The Parker Library holds a magnificent collection of English illuminated manuscripts, such as the Bury and Dover Bibles (c. 1135 and c. 1150) and the Chronica maiora by Matthew Paris (c. 1230-50). Scholars in a variety of disciplines - including historians of art, music, science, literature, politics and religion - find invaluable resources in the Library's collection.

Clyfford Still: The Works on Paper
Clyfford Still (1904–1980) may have explored the potential of drawing more than any other artist of his time. The sheer volume (more than 2,300) and variety of Still’s works on paper reveal the centrality of drawing within his lifelong creative process. Over six decades, Still explored (and showed considerable mastery of) the entire range of drawing media—graphite, charcoal, pastel, crayon, pen and ink, oil paint, gouache, and tempera on paper—as well as the printmaking techniques of lithography, etching, woodcut, and silkscreen. Examined together, these works on paper tell the story of an artist who never lost an experimental and curious approach to his art, even as his mature work became quintessentially deliberate and monumental.

Vincent van Gogh: The Letters
All the surviving letters written and received by Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) are contained in this edition of his correspondence. Excepting only the digital form in which they are now being published, this is the continuation of a long tradition.

Faces of Frida
Faces of Frida is a collaboration between the tech giant and a worldwide network of experts and 33 partner museums in seven countries. Accessible via the Google Arts & Culture app and website, Faces of Frida is the largest collection of artworks and objects related to Kahlo ever compiled.

Palmyra

In this 21st century, war in Syria has irrevocably changed the ancient caravan city of Palmyra, famed as a meeting place of civilizations since its apogee in the mid-2nd to 3rd century CE. The Romans and Parthians knew Palmyra as a wealthy oasis metropolis, a center of culture and trade on the edge of their empires. Stretching some three kilometers across the Tadmurean desert, the ruins of Palmyra, like all ruins, stand as bearers of meaning marking their place in history. For centuries, traveling artists and explorers have documented the site in former states of preservation. Created as a tribute to Palmyra, this online exhibition captures the site as it was photographed for the first time by Louis Vignes in 1864 and illustrated in the 18th century by the architect Louis-Fran├žois Cassas. Their works contribute to Palmyra's legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.