Wednesday, October 16, 2019

CFP: The Innovative Library Classroom (TILC) 2020 - Williamsburg, Virginia - June 4-5, 2020

The Innovative Library Classroom (TILC) 2020
Poster Session & Social on Thursday, June 4 and Conference on Friday, June 5, 2020
William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

“TILC is probably the friendliest, most useful, most awesome conference I've ever attended!"- past attendee

“Powerful and inspiring day! It was a joy to network and meet so many people from different schools interested in library instruction. Every part of the conference, from the sessions, posters, to lightning talks provided thought-provoking topics and information. I'm so glad to be a part of this passionate and creative field of librarianship."- another participant's feedback

We are now accepting proposals for TILC 2020. We are thrilled to share that Derrick Jefferson, Communication Librarian from American University, will be our keynote speaker.

The theme is “Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Are Not Synonyms.” Although the acronym EDI may imply that equity, diversity, and inclusion are one entity, each has value on its own. While equity, diversity, and inclusion inform each other, we need to understand and address each concept individually in order to create meaningful educational experiences that can benefit all of our students. DeEtta Jones summarizes the distinctions with this comparison, “[I]f your organization is a sports stadium, diversity would ask, ‘Who is at the game?’ Inclusion would ask, ‘Are everyone’s seats comfortable?’ Finally, equity would ask, ‘Has anyone been left out of the park? If so, why?’” A fuller perspective can be read at https://deettajones.com/equity-the-missing-piece-of-the-edi-puzzle/.
We hope this theme will help you brainstorm proposals, but don’t let it limit you. Anything about innovative practices related to teaching and learning in libraries is welcome.

Proposals are invited for three different session types:
•       Posters (presented at the Thursday evening social)
•       50-minute presentations
•       7-minute lightning talks


We are looking for lightning talks in which presenters share something new they tried this year. In 7 minutes, the presenter will explain what problem they were trying to solve, what they hoped would happen, what actually happened, and what lessons they learned. New idea you’re considering? Great! Recent program that went well? Share it! Activity that completely failed? We can all learn from it! For the proposal, we don’t expect you to know what the outcome will be yet; instead, we’ll ask you to consider how you’ll judge the success level.

Selection Process

Proposals will be peer reviewed and then selected by the conference organizers to ensure that TILC offers sessions on a range of topics from a diverse set of institutions and presenters. Note that you may be invited to present in a format other than the one you proposed.

Submission deadline: Monday, November 25, 2019
Acceptance notification: Friday, January 10, 2020
We expect registration costs to be about $50.

Full details and links to the proposal forms are available at: http://theinnovativelibraryclassroom.weebly.com/

Liz.

Elizabeth Kocevar-Weidinger
Head of Research and Instruction Services, Preston Library
Virginia Military Institute
Lexington, VA 24450
540.464.7873
kocevar-weidingerea@vmi.edu

Call for Applications: Book Review Editor for College & Research Libraries

Applications and nominations are invited for the position of book review editor of College & Research Libraries (C&RL), the scholarly research journal of ACRL.

The book review editor will work closely with the editor, members of the Editorial Board, production staff, and a team of reviewers to provide reviews of new publications pertinent to academic and research librarians. The book review editor will be appointed for an initial, three-year term and will be expected to shepherd the publication of a minimum of six reviews per C&RL issue for a total of a minimum of 36 reviews per calendar year.

The application deadline is Friday, November 1, 2019. Please visit ACRL Insider for complete details and application information.


Erin Owens (formerly Cassidy)
Associate Professor, Access Services Coordinator & Scholarly Communications Librarian
History Librarian
Newton Gresham Library, SHSU Box 2179
Phone: 936-294-4567
Pronouns: she/her

CFP: School Libraries Worldwide Volume 26, Number 1 (January 2020) - The Basics

School Libraries Worldwide Volume 26, Number 1 (January 2020)

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Basics

For the January 2020 issue, School Libraries Worldwide’s editors are especially interested in papers in which The Basics are an aspect of the research’ that is, we are especially interested in papers that center on the core functions of school librarianship and their enduring value. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, empirical research relating to:

  • Reading for pleasure or for academic content;
  • Information seeking processes;
  • Instructional collaboration;
  • Empathetic services; and
  • Collection development and management

School Libraries Worldwide also welcomes submissions of excellent, original research on any topic relating to school librarianship for the open portion of the journal. We are especially interested in research that documents school librarianship in a wide range of cultures, geographic locations, and/or diversities.

School library researchers are invited to submit papers reporting their own original research that has not been published elsewhere.


Deadline for submissions of full papers: December 15, 2019.

Note that all submissions must take place through the online submission system at http://slw.cci.fsu.edu


Authors with questions about contributing to this issue should contact the editors, Marcia Mardis (mmardis@fsu.edu) and Nancy Everhart (everhart@fsu.edu).

Submission guidelines are available online at: http://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/contributors.html


School Libraries Worldwide is the official professional and research journal of the International Association of School Librarianship. Peer reviewed and refereed, it is published twice yearly, in January and July, and is available online and through many leading periodical databases. Selected public access articles are available at http://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/public.html

School Libraries Worldwide publishes new works of current research and scholarship on any aspect of school librarianship. All papers are double-blind peer reviewed and adhere to the highest editorial standards.

Submissions and suggestions for the journal should be sent to:

Dr. Marcia A. Mardis and Dr. Nancy Everhart
Editors, School Libraries Worldwide
School of Information
College of Communication & Information
Florida State University
Tallahassee FL 32306-2100 USA
E-mail: slw@cci.fsu.edu

Call for Academic BRASS Newsletter Submissions - Business Librarianship

Interested in seeing your name in print? Want to add another line to your CV?
Have something to share with other business librarians?

The Business Reference in Academic Libraries Committee of BRASS is seeking articles for the next issue of its online publication Academic BRASS. Academic BRASS is a newsletter--not a journal--that publishes issue-based articles and information for the general and educational interest of BRASS members and academic business librarians.


Topics of interest to the editors are those dealing with business librarianship, such as resources, liaison and outreach activities, strategies, and instruction. Reviews of books, databases, and web sites are welcome as well.


Maybe you have another cool idea - that's fine too - get those submissions in!
Deadline for submissions for the upcoming issue is November 22, 2019.


You may want to see previous editions. For access to the full text articles of past issues of Academic BRASS, see http://www.ala.org/rusa/sections/brass/publications/academicbrass
The typical length of an Academic BRASS article is 500-800 words, but past articles have been as long as 1,000 words or more. Authors should be guided by what they have to say rather than an arbitrary word length. All articles are subject to editing for length, style, and content. The newsletter follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition for all matters of style and citation. Authors whose articles include references to print or Internet resources are urged to observe the conventions set forth in that publication and on the APA web site (http://www.apastyle.org/).

Please send article proposals or submissions to both of the editors, Janet Franks at janet.franks@saintleo.edu<mailto:janet.franks@saintleo.edu> and Wendy Pothier at wendy.pothier@unh.edu<mailto:wendy.pothier@unh.edu> . If you have any questions, please query Janet Franks.

CFP: Reorganization of the Library: Investigating the Consequences @LibJuicePress

Call for Proposals

Reorganization of the Library: Investigating the Consequences
Edited by: Tim Ribaric

Library services are steeped in tradition and are built upon decades of past practice that have shaped the way patrons envision the library. These services also reinforce the mission of the library as a stalwart to the academic mission of the institution. However the library is not immune to change and this is being demonstrated in numerous contemporary library reorganizations that are occurring across academic institutions in North America and beyond. Quite often these exercises involve reorganizing staff and reporting lines in an attempt to find efficiencies and to provide new services. However, these reorganization exercises often create conflicts with established workflows, upend professional trajectories, and sometimes create labour issues. In addition, motivations and precipitating reasons for these exercises are often opaque and not clearly constructed. This work will investigate the current trend of library reorganization exercises, analyze the impacts, and investigate motivated factors.

Suggested Topics Include:

  • Case studies
  • Reorganization frameworks/methodologies 
  • Organizational studies perspectives
  • Interrogation of 'change management' discourse
  • Bloat in quantity, and purview in administration positions 
  • Deprofessionalization
  • Upskilling, changing roles, and continuing education
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusion perspectives
  • The effect of management trends and fads
  • Vocabularies and taxonomies (e.g. use of terminology such as "teams")
  • Autonomy, professional identity and power-shifts
  • Longitudinal studies of effectiveness and effects
  • Exploration of rhetoric, "fear of change" dialog
  • Comparative studies of techniques and outcomes
  • The transition from liaison/subject librarianship to functional librarianship
  • Modeling library services on 'market needs'
  • Discussions on neoliberalism in the academy and ramifications to Library services
  • Investigations of what is driving the neoliberal restructuring exercise
  • Strategic grievance filing
  • Self-governance mechanisms utilized in reorganization exercises

Estimated final submission length is between 5000 and 8000 words. The work will be published by Library Juice Press. Interested authors should provide a 500 word abstract to Tim Ribaric <tribaric@brocku.ca> before January 1, 2020. Notice of acceptance February 1. Submissions due: July 1. Anticipated publication date is Fall 2020.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Call for Chapter Proposals: Intersections of OER and Information Literacy to be published by ACRL



We are pleased to announce a call for chapter for proposals for our upcoming edited book,
Intersections of Open Educational Resources and Information Literacy, to be published open access by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) in electronic and print formats. Authors retain copyright of their chapters.

Edited by
Elizabeth Dill (edill@troy.edu), Troy University
Mary Ann Cullen (mcullen@gsu.edu), Georgia State University

Proposal Deadline November 15, 2019

Notification of Selected Authors/Chapters
Early January, 2020

Authors Submit Completed Chapters
June 15, 2020

Description
How do you incorporate open pedagogy (resulting from writing/using OER and/or utilizing open pedagogical practices) in information literacy instruction?

Open Educational Resources (OER) have transformed higher education. Along with the scholarship of creating of open textbooks, OER have evolved to incorporate open pedagogical practices: In a natural progression of OER-enabled pedagogy, innovative librarians are incorporating “openness” in information literacy instruction. The resulting engagement offers a social justice element to the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy.
      Both the use of open materials in library instruction and the application of information literacy principles in user-created open materials increase access and focus on the threshold concepts found in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy.
      The use of open materials in library instruction allows equal access to information and the resulting information literacy principles. The process of student-created materials in open pedagogy provides opportunities to learn Framework principles.

This edited collection will provide ideas and strategies for both community college and university librarians, as well as faculty, to take a more holistic view of their own OER information literacy practices. In these chapters, authors will share their experiences, providing concrete examples of information literacy integration in both open classrooms and textbooks. Authors may also discuss their efforts to embed the Information Literacy Framework within library instruction and classroom environments.

Intersections of Open Educational Resources and Information Literacy will feature theory, research, case studies, pedagogy, and best practices from librarians and other practitioners. Discussions may include, but are not restricted to, OER in the context of one or more frames of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy.

Chapters will be peer-reviewed.

Chapter Ideas
      Thought pieces regarding how information literacy informs creating OER and teaching in the open education movement
      Case studies on how librarians and faculty have incorporated information literacy within their classes using OERs.
      Accounts about how the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy has been implemented in OER/open environments
      Research about how OER invite faculty and students to contribute to “scholarship as conversation”
      Issues experienced with instructors using OER “ethically and legally” and how were they resolved
     Examples of scholarly communications librarians incorporating information literacy into open textbooks
      Opportunities to teach information literacy concepts in the context of OER instruction for faculty and other university partners.
      How OER materials provide equal opportunities to develop information literacy skills.
      Collaboration with other academic departments to incorporate information literacy instruction in OER materials.
      Teaching information literacy concepts in the context of open pedagogy.

Chapters might include details about:
      Partnerships used to facilitate information literacy and OER
      Scalability and sustainability of IL/OER initiatives
      Successes and disappointments
      Pros and cons of approaches or methods
      Measures of success and assessment efforts
      Lessons learned from commingling

Chapter Selection Criteria
Chapter proposals will be selected based on:
      Appropriateness of fit with the book’s theme
      Clarity of intent
      Originality and significance of the theoretical, empirical, and/or practical contribution of the content
      Quality of writing
      Likelihood of achieving outcomes by deadline
      Basis in theory, research, and/or practice
      Contribution to the overall book
Acceptance of a proposal does not guarantee inclusion in the final book.

Proposal Information required
      Proposed chapter title
      Description of chapter: Theoretical, Research, Case Study, Best Practices, or Other
      Chapter summary (500 word maximum)
      Author(s) name, professional title, & contact information
      Author biography (100 words maximum)

Submission Process
Authors interested in submitting chapters should complete the proposal form on or before November 15, 2019.

Please direct questions to Elizabeth Dill (edill@troy.edu) or Mary Ann Cullen (mcullen@gsu.edu).


Monday, October 14, 2019

CFP: The Innovative Library Classroom, June 5, 2020 in Williamsburg, VA

The Innovative Library Classroom (TILC) 2020
Poster Session & Social on Thursday, June 4 and Conference on Friday, June 5, 2020
William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

“TILC is probably the friendliest, most useful, most awesome conference I've ever attended!"- past attendee
“Powerful and inspiring day! It was a joy to network and meet so many people from different schools interested in library instruction. Every part of the conference, from the sessions, posters, to lightning talks provided thought-provoking topics and information. I'm so glad to be a part of this passionate and creative field of librarianship."- another participant's feedback

We are now accepting proposals for TILC 2020. We are thrilled to share that Derrick Jefferson, Communication Librarian from American University, will be our keynote speaker.

The theme is “Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Are Not Synonyms.” Although the acronym EDI may imply that equity, diversity, and inclusion are one entity, each has value on its own. While equity, diversity, and inclusion inform each other, we need to understand and address each concept individually in order to create meaningful educational experiences that can benefit all of our students. DeEtta Jones summarizes the distinctions with this comparison, “[I]f your organization is a sports stadium, diversity would ask, ‘Who is at the game?’ Inclusion would ask, ‘Are everyone’s seats comfortable?’ Finally, equity would ask, ‘Has anyone been left out of the park? If so, why?’” A fuller perspective can be read at https://deettajones.com/equity-the-missing-piece-of-the-edi-puzzle/.
We hope this theme will help you brainstorm proposals, but don’t let it limit you. Anything about innovative practices related to teaching and learning in libraries is welcome.

Proposals are invited for three different session types:
•       Posters (presented at the Thursday evening social)
•       50-minute presentations
•       7-minute lightning talks


We are looking for lightning talks in which presenters share something new they tried this year. In 7 minutes, the presenter will explain what problem they were trying to solve, what they hoped would happen, what actually happened, and what lessons they learned. New idea you’re considering? Great! Recent program that went well? Share it! Activity that completely failed? We can all learn from it! For the proposal, we don’t expect you to know what the outcome will be yet; instead, we’ll ask you to consider how you’ll judge the success level.

Selection Process

Proposals will be peer reviewed and then selected by the conference organizers to ensure that TILC offers sessions on a range of topics from a diverse set of institutions and presenters. Note that you may be invited to present in a format other than the one you proposed.

Submission deadline: Monday, November 25, 2019
Acceptance notification: Friday, January 10, 2020

We expect registration costs to be about $50.

Full details and links to the proposal forms are available at: http://theinnovativelibraryclassroom.weebly.com/

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Call for Copy Editors, Proof Readers, and Layout Assistant Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)

Call for Volunteers: Copy Editors, Proof Readers, and Layout Assistant

Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)


Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ) is an open-access, online, peer reviewed, scholarly journal devoted to advancing research in library marketing and its components (public relations, publicity, outreach, advocacy, and promotions).  

The Journal is international in scope and open to all libraries; public, academic, and special.   Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ) is independently produced, open access (gold & green), and is published twice a year.  Our ISSN is 2475-8116 and we are currently indexed in WorldCat, the International ISSN database, and the Directory of Open Access Journals.


Our web site can be found at http://journal.marketinglibraries.org

Our journal is growing and we are seeking additional copy editors, proof readers, and layout assistants to join our production team. If you are interested in volunteering to be a part of the Journal, please email a brief statement of interest (50-100 words) and a recent copy of your CV.

Please email map@marketinglibraries.org if you have any questions!

Thank you!

Mark Aaron Polger, Editor-in-Chief & Founder
Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)
http://journal.marketinglibraries.org 
map@marketinglibraries.org  

Friday, October 11, 2019

CFP: ALCTS RPLTS Interest Group at ALA Midwinter 2020 - Role of the Professional Librarian in Technical Services

ALCTS RPLTS IG (Role of the Professional Librarian in Technical Services Interest Group) is looking for speakers to present at ALA’s 2020 Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia, PA, on Saturday, January 25, 2020, from 10:30 – 11:30 am.

The IG will be discussing training and professional development related topics pertaining to Digital Repositories (see below). Presentations addressing trainings, either on their formats, content, or their development and implementation etc. in this area are all welcome.

Each presentation can be allocated 15 minutes (full presentation) or 10-5 minutes (light presentation). Please submit your proposal by Monday, November 11 to https://forms.gle/3QW8FKGfQ5sQpCnJ8. Proposals should not be sent in reply to this post.

Theme: Training Librarians and Staff Members to Work with Digital Repositories
Possible Topics include:
  • Training designed for various digital repositories, such as Digital Commons, Islandora, CONTENTdm, DSpace, Omeka, Samvera etc.;
  • Training on working with different types of digital repositories, such as open access, proprietary, data repositories and institutional repositories;
  • Training developed in selecting, starting a digital repository or migrating to a different repository;
  • Knowledge and skill sets needed to work with a variety of digital repositories;
  • Training on value-added features, services and tools in working with digital repositories;
  • Training on working with different types of materials (e.g., cultural heritage, data) in a digital repository;
  • Training on system functionality, roles, policy and workflows in dealing with different digital repositories;
  • Training on digital repository related services and collaborations on campus and beyond;
  • Training cases and experiences on working with a wide variety of digital repositories;
  • Training development for librarians and staff members to work with digital repositories;
  • Digital repository related trainings developed by different libraries, organizations, communities or consortiums;
  • Training on any other aspect of working with a digital repository, such as metadata, harvesting, aggregating, search, indexing, copyright, system management, customization etc.                   

We are looking forward to hearing from you!

RPLTS Interest Group Co-Chairs:
Christine Davidian davidian@rowan.edu
Sai Deng Sai.Deng@ucf.edu

RPLTS Interest Group Co-Vice-Chairs:
Sherab Chen chen.1140@osu.edu

Call for Lightning Round Talks: Promoting Libraries to Non-Traditional students. ACRL (National) Library Marketing & Outreach Interest Group (LMOIG) Greater NYC Meetup

Call for Lightning Round Talks:  Promoting Libraries to Non-Traditional students.
ACRL (National) Library Marketing & Outreach Interest Group (LMOIG)
Greater NYC Meetup

How do you promote your library to non-traditional students?  How do you engage and target students who may not fit the profile of a typical undergraduate student?   How do you promote libraries to students who may be parents or grandparents, who take courses 100% online, and who may work full time while studying ?  We are seeking brief, lightning round talks (10-15 mins) on how you promote your libraries to non-traditional students. Share your successes and failures, best tips, and what you've learned! We want to learn from you!

Complete the proposal form today! ------- > https://form.jotform.com/92827382986172​

Our Fall 2019 meeting will be held at:

Berkeley College, Manhattan Campus
Thursday Nov 21, 2019 (2:30pm-4:30pm)
3 East 43rd street,  room TBA

About the ACRL National LMOIG Interest Group:

Launched at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference, this interest group encourages regional meet ups around the U.S. as a central initiative. The ACRL National Library Marketing and Outreach Interest Group has been created for Academic Librarians interested in Marketing and Outreach. This group is open to all.

For more information, please request to join our Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/acrl.lmao

Thanks,

Mark, Maria, and Jessica

Mark Aaron Polger, Co-Chair
Coordinator of Library Outreach
College of Staten Island, City University of New York (CUNY) 

Maria Deptula, Co-Chair
Associate Director
Online Campus at Berkeley College

Jessica Kiebler, Co-Chair
Instructional Services Librarian
Pace University Library

Call for Authors: Practical Guides for Librarians series (Rowman & Littlefield)

It's that time of year again! We're starting to get ready for another set of books for the Practical Guides for Librarians series from Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. I'm looking for authors and book ideas for next year's books!!! We're hoping to do 10 books in these main areas of interest - technology, makerspaces, and young adult topics.

If you think you might be interested in writing a book for the series - yes there are royalties involved!! - please briefly pitch me your idea on the linked form. It doesn't have to be a full proposal - just a sentence or two with your idea.

Here's the full call for participation, please check out the books we've already done at:
https://rowman.com/Action/SERIES/RL/RLPGL/The-Practical-Guides-for-Librarians
so you don't pitch those same ideas!:

https://ellyssa.wufoo.com/forms/s1agh5mz1juejb7/

Best,

Ellyssa

________________________

Ellyssa Kroski
Writer/Librarian/Instructor/Speaker
ellyssakroski@yahoo.com
http://amazon.com/author/ellyssa

Tuesday, October 08, 2019

CFP: Southern University and College Academic Business Librarians (SOUCABL) 2020 Conference - March 2020 in Athens Georgia

The Papers & Presentations Committee for the Southern University and College Academic Business Librarians (SOUCABL) Conference is now accepting proposals for the March 2020 conference. Please see the CFP below for details. For more on the SOUCABL conference, visit the website<http://soucablconference.mozello.com/>.

Call for Proposals, due December 3rd

What:              The SOUCABL Conference: Chapter 2

When:             Wednesday March 11, 2020 to Friday March 13, 2020

Where:            Miller Learning Center

48 Baxter Street

The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602


Are you an academic business librarian? In the Southern US?  If so, the SOUCABL Conference is for you! The Southern University and College Academic Business Librarians Conference is a great opportunity to meet other information professionals, develop your network of colleagues, share ideas, and brainstorm solutions. If you work in academia and are responsible for business or entrepreneurship, consider attending this fantastic regional conference. Space is limited to keep it manageable and highly interactive.


This event is an affordable opportunity for librarians to discuss business librarianship and to network with other librarians in the region. Participants are invited from 14 states and the District of Columbia including: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.


The Papers & Presentations Committee is accepting proposals on topics related to business librarianship in a variety of presentation formats. We especially encourage proposal submissions from librarians who work at smaller institutions in the South or for whom business/entrepreneurship is only one of their responsibilities.


Topics

"I have not failed.  I have found 10,000 ways that won't work" - Thomas Edison


Conference presentations often center around success stories and those instances when everything goes exactly to plan. While success stories are great, we want to encourage the sharing of failures and the lessons learned from them at SOUCABL: Chapter 2. It is often our failures that teach us the most powerful lessons. What issues are you dealing with? What strategies are you using to combat limited resources & staffing? What worked? What didn't work? We want to hear everything.


Suggested topics may include, but are not limited to:

  *   Instruction & teaching strategies
  *   Outreach (to students, faculty, campus partners, community members, etc.) and partnerships
  *   When business is not your only specialty or focus
  *   Research strategies & resources
  *   Collection development for both physical & electronic resources
  *   Failures or challenges you face in all of the above aspects of librarianship


Formats

Select a format for your proposal.

  *   Presentation
     *   Presentations will be 15 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A.

  *   Roundtable discussion
     *   Roundtables are small, informal group discussions lasting 60 minutes. They are opportunities to share information, discuss successes and failures, and exchange best practices and network with others around common themes.

  *   Poster
     *   The poster session is an opportunity to share your innovative project, best practices, failure stories, and issues related to business librarianship. If you would like a template, consider using the ones found here: https://osf.io/ef53g/.


  *   Lightning Talks

These are new to SOUCABL in 2020! There will be time on Thursday afternoon for lightning talks. A lightning talk is a fast paced 5 minute talk on the topic of your choosing. You can sign up for a slot at the conference during breaks and lunch. See here<http://perl.plover.com/lt/lightning-talks.html> for more about lightning talks, and this summary of why you might want to do one:

*         Maybe you've never given a talk before, and you'd like to start small. For a Lightning Talk, you don't need to make slides, and if you do decide to make slides, you only need to make three.

*         Maybe you're nervous and you're afraid you'll mess up. It's a lot easier to plan and deliver a five minute talk than it is to deliver a long talk. And if you do mess up, at least the painful part will be over quickly.

*         Maybe you don't have much to say. Maybe you just want to ask a question, or invite people to help you with your project, or boast about something you did, or tell a short cautionary story. These things are all interesting and worth talking about, but there might not be enough to say about them to fill up thirty minutes.


What to submit

Proposals are accepted via this submission form<https://forms.gle/cjYPq4RcNwE9przDA>. Here is what you will be asked to include:

  *   Presentation
     *   Title
     *   Abstract
     *   Learning Objective(s): "Attendees will..."
  *   Roundtable Discussion
     *   Explain the importance of the topic covered
     *   Relevance to business librarianship
     *   3 questions you would use to keep the discussion moving
     *   Handout or visual aid that participants can follow along with & take with them
  *   Poster
     *   Title
     *   Abstract
     *   Learning Objective(s): "Attendees will..."


Questions

Contact the Program Committee with any questions or for more information.

Summer Krstevska, krstevs@wfu.edu<mailto:krstevs@wfu.edu>

Nancy Lovas, nancy64@email.unc.edu<mailto:nancy64@email.unc.edu>

Tyler Martindale, tem0032@auburn.edu<mailto:tem0032@auburn.edu>


Tyler Martindale
Business & Economics Librarian
Auburn University Libraries
231 Mell St, Room 2338F
Auburn, AL 36849-5606